About your Search

20120901
20120930
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 15
CSPAN 14
WETA 9
KQED (PBS) 8
CNN 6
CNNW 6
CSPAN2 6
KRCB (PBS) 6
COM 4
WMPT (PBS) 4
FBC 2
CNBC 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
MSNBC 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 102
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
at the importance of kazakhstan in the region, and it's a relationship which the united states. "this is america" visits of the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. later, i will talk with kazakhstan's foreign minister. right now, a visit with the u.s. ambassador to kazakhstan, kenneth fairfax. >> what should americans know about kazakhstan? >> i think the short answer is a lot more than they currently do. >> thank you. >> it is the ninth largest country on earth. it is a country that has a rather extraordinary relations with the united states, and yet most people really know either nothing or worse than nothing -- what they have seen in a movie, which is the opposite of reality, of course. there is a lot to learn. >> what are the mutual interests of the two countries, the united states and kazakhstan? >> we have many. you can look at it as an
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
the united states, i am sure libya receives money. it was even greater because the american ambassador -- i am supportive of the arab spring. the times and elsewhere, i said to myself, they are not great people. but they are people that surely will turn out nice to us. it doesn't make any sense. >> the events of the last week, the embassy attacks, it will result in a further ongoing shift of jewish americans changing -- >> i think there is a little more to follow. the shift in special elections indicated deep distrust of this administration. that was clear. what the administration said, you heard what the state said. the message was sent loud and clear. for a while, i think it was always together. we have heard the state department say that they have taken every reasonable step. we have heard the quote from the ambassador suggesting he was comfortable and these people love me. it's not true. he issued a statement saying he is very concerned about his own safety. again, we have an information gap. that is coming home to roost. this will build. >> today's new york times, the interview with th
know one thing about him. he does not fail. let's hear it for the next president of the united states. [applause] >> thanks, sweetie. that's quite an introduction here. i got how many introductions tonight? anyone else want to offer an introduction? thank you. this really is a critical time for the country, and i think a time of choice. elections are always about choice. i think the choice is in more stark relief than most electrics. i think in part because of where the country is. i think when you have $16 trillion in debt, when you see places like europe facing fiscal calamity or crisis, while you recognize these are critical times, what you have in this country, 23 million americans out of work, 23 million. when half the kids coming out of college can't find work or work consistent with an education that includes college, think about that? this is america. what's happened? and so the president and i offered two very distinct paths. his path is one which has been not just spoken about, we've seen it. we don't have to guess what his path might look like or what he would do, because h
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
are not going to t along with anyone, so why try to pacify them? england, the united states, get out of the united nations. i'm tired of hearing hate speeches from people from other countries condemning us. this is a united nations of hate. host: if you go to the united nations web site, it says -- what you think? caller: i think at the time it was probably a good thing, but i don't think they counted on the rise of communism from china and russia and on the muslims and i think the muslims are a big problem with the united nations right now and we should stop trying to pacify them. we have a wenow who seems to sit there and watched-- we have a president now who seems to sit there and watch it. all he has been doing is apologizing. they killed two of our soldiers in afghanistan and the apologized to them. when the embassy was attacked, it was the man who had the movie's iffault. these people hate us. host: here is this on twitter -- here's the washington post front page -- many remember last year when the palestinian leader's request for membership was denied, not something supported
for the country. against perceived internal and external dangerous forces. israel, united states, first at the regime. vicious than enough of that over the decades and afterward he went from credence to that notion, that paranoia. so the syrian population made this bargain with the regime that they would give freedoms in return for stability and security, especially with the examples of instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the re
. >> the united states will not allow iran to acquire a nuclear weapon. we'll do what it takes to prevent that from happening. all options remain on the table. the president has been very clear and that includes the military option. >> shannon: our ambassador to the united nations says the u.s. will stand with israel and do what it takes to stop oran from developing a nuclear weapon, as israeli prime minister netanyahu says iran is 7 to 8 months away from being able to build a nuclear bomb and demands that the united states give a red line to iran. we start with peter doos gee senator john mechanic cane said an hour and-a-half that he thinks the united states is sing exactly the wrong main to the israelis about whether or not we will have their back, if iran gets closer to building a nuclear weapon. >> we keep tells the israelis not to attack, shouldn't we be telling the iranians that that we are with israel and they should back down. >> reporter: the u.s. bamdass dorto the u.n. says that the united states will do whatever it takes to prevent iran from acquiring the nuclear weapon and the
. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 21, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable richard blumenthal, a senator from the state of connecticut, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader smed. mr. reid: i had move to proceed to calendar number 504. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 504, s. 3525, a bill to protect and enhance opportunities for recreational hunting, fish, and shooting and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: the next hour will be equally divided between the two leader leaders who are their designees.
. the impasse is just one of the many strains on relations between russia and the united states. iran is another is the dis trust over nato's defense shield. earlier this month the u.s. agency of the international development to lead russia. i'm pleased to have sergey lavrov back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much, nice to be back. >> rose: u.s.-russia relations. >> yes, i believe we agree that these relations should be promoted. when president obama came to the whitehouse, he and his team assessed the relationship between moscow and washington and suggested what they call the reset of those relations which we supported. and i believe that since then, we have been having understanding between us, between moscow and russia, that the really mutually beneficial partnership in the interest of the russian and american people in the interest of international relations given the importance of the two countries can be based on equal, mutually respectful, mually beneficial relatiohip. and on that route, we achieved quite a lot. i would be incomplete if i don't mention that there are problems
, president of the united states of america. >> mr. president, mr. secretary general, fellow delegates, ladies and gentleman, i would like to begin today by telling you about an american named chris stevens. chris was born in a town called grass valley, california, the son of a lawyer and a musician. as a young man, chris joined the peace corps, and taught english in morocco. and he came to love and respect the people of north africa and the middle east. he would carry that commitment throughout his life. as a diplomat, he worked from egypt to syria, from saudi arabia to libya. he was known for walking the streets of the cities where he worked -- tasting the local food, meeting as many people as he could, speaking arabic, listening with a broad smile. chris went to benghazi in the early days of the libyan revolution, arriving on a cargo ship. as america's representative, he helped the libyan people as they coped with violent conflict, cared for the wounded, and crafted a vision for the future in which the rights of all libyans would be respected. and after the revolution, he supported the birt
an address by his excellency, felipe calderon, president of the united mexican states. . [no audio] [no audio] >> on behalf of the general assembly, i have the honor to welcome to the united nations, his excellency felipe calderon hinojosa, president of the united mexican state to address the assembly. [applause] >> send your president take -- -- mr. president and head of state and ladies and gentlemen -- out of conviction and as a result of history, mexico is a strategic ally of the united nations. we were one of the founding countries of the united nations and as a founding country, we fully share its fundamental precepts, the precepts of our great organization. for me, this will be the last time i will be attending as the president of mexico. it will be the last time i attended the general assembly of the united nations. over the past six years, my country has taken part in very different fora to pave the way for you and initiatives. we have endeavored to strengthen the u n and make it the main body for dialogue and peace and for security and for the application of international law and, i
to dissociate the united states from that hateful video that insulted the prophet of islam. he said that there are important rights of free speech under the first amendment and we have to protect those rights, and if the government a press free-speech, it makes the world a less free place. he also had a message for iran, that while we want to negotiate through diplomacy if possible, time is not unlimited. that was a warning to the iranian government, which has been obstreperous and very difficult to deal with. i think it was a very important speech the president gave in new york. host: how about mitt romney? can you assess from what you have heard and hear him write these past few months? is there a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encapsulate it? guest: i don't know if there is a romney doctrine yet. governor romney is a very smart, successful person. my guess is that it is not the issue he wants to emphasize in the campaign. once the campaign to be about the economy and the unemployment rate. it is a difficult position for a republican to be running against a democ
for the viewrs of others. and he disassociated the united states from the hateful video that was made in california that derotted the prophet mohammed and islam. and the president said this is his main point, he was passionate about it. the americans have an abiding belief in made a compelling case mr.. he also had a message for iran and that is that while we want to negotiate our differences through diplomacy if that's possible, that time is not unlimited. i thought it was a warning to the iranian government is a difficult deal with. i thought it was a important speech that the president gave yesterday in my. >> >> host: how about mitt romney can, you assess from what yoaf heard and have seen over the months. is there anything close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for r
, in a sense, talking about, like, the 99%. think of, you know, some of the demonstrators m united states or in europe who have also said that the system is rigged against them. there might be some resonance. >> the american delegation, they walk out. clearly, that was not unexpected, but you did have some real power players who are sitting there. he does have a world audience, a wobbled stage. you've got russia wra. you have iran. china. the u.k. many of these other very powerful players here. how do they respond to them him? >> you know, if you look at russia and china, they believe that each country should be loued to do what it wants, and if they want to talk, let them talk. although russia does support the let's say movement to try to limit iran's ability to develop a nuclear bomb, and that would put them on the side of the united states. when it comes to kind of let them talk, they would sit there and listen to it. the united states decided not to even walk out. they didn't even walk in. they issued a statement. maybe we can read that statement if we have it. yes. coming from the sp
respect our common humanity. i have made it clear that the united states had nothing to do with this video. it is an insult to muslims, and everyone. we are the home to muslims worship across our country. we not only respect the freedom of religion, we have laws that protect individuals from being harmed because of how they look or what they believe. we understand why people take offense to this video because millions of our citizens are among them. host: more headlines following these speeches, "obama talks tough on mideast extremism." "uses addressed to regain the initiative on foreign policy." if you look at the front page of "the washington times" this , the right "the expected campaign advantage on foreign policy suddenly in doubt, the president portrayed the deaths of the americans in libya has inflamed tensions over an anti- islamic movie rather than tensions based on american policy in the middle east." from "the washington times," the headline says "romney, exchange for reform." "seeking to carve ou host: here is mitt romney at the clinton global initiative. [video clip] >> the pr
and a stern warning. the israeli prime min sister warning the united states to establish a clear line that iran cannot cross with the nuclear program. this morning we ask what is that line and what happens if it's crossed? >>> front page scandal. the royal family trying to stop topless pictures of kate from spreading. an italian magazine owned by the former prime minister silvio berlusconi is publishing a 38-page special edition. it's hitting newsstands now. >> a replacement ref replaced before the kickoff. side judge brian stropolo booted for openly being a saints fan. he posted pictures of himself in saints gearal gating. monday morning quarterback this one. one. "newsroom" begins right now. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello. we begin this hour with muslim outrage and new flare-ups of anti-american violence. one flash point, kabul, afghanistan. crowds of protesters turn on police when they try to block their march toward the u.s. embassy. at least 15 officers are hurt and their vehicles set on fire. in ind
be clear. we cannot solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not seek to dictate the outcome of democrat transitions abroad. we do not expect other nations to agree with us on every issue. >>reporter: the president has not classified the attack as a terror attack but says this is an attack not on just america but on the entire mandate and values of the u.n. >>shepard: you mentioned that governor romney is in new york city and he and his are saying the president is failing to lead. >>reporter: they are hitting the president for the fact he was taping an episode of "the view" running today and did not meet with binyamin netanyahu. they feel he should show more leadership on the world stage. here is the laying out of the case. ought president has demonstrated there really isn't a central rudder to our foreign policy coming out of the white house. most americans are looking at it wanting to see pore -- more leadership. >>reporter: the president is not letting those attacks get to him. on way out of the u.n. he recognized a security guard from a previous vis
and the stability of the global economy. that's why the united states will do what we must to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >>shepard: the president has been under fire for not meeting with binyamin netanyahu or any world leaders. despite multiple requests from netanyahu, the president did not set a red line on iran's nuclear activities. that takes us to our chief white house corporate following the president on the campaign trail. the president says the united states will always stand up for freedom. there are limits to america's influence. >>reporter: it is rare to have the two major candidates in the same city, a mile and a half apart. the president is at the u.n. mitt romney was at the clinton global initiative. the to candidates are offering such two sharply different visions about what to do with the mill east. mitt romney charging the president is sitting on the side lines and letting events dictate the situation. the president said the opposite. >> let me be clear. we cannot solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not seek to dictate the outc
of his top commanders threatens attacks on the united states and its interests if the country gets drawn into a war with israel. bill: watch the story this week as david lee miller starts the coverage at u.n. what do we know about the threats out of iran that we're hearing, david lee? >> reporter: bill this threat was made over the weekend the same time the iranian president was meeting it with the secretary-general of the united nations. came from the top commander in the iranian revolutionary guard. he said u.s. interests in the middle east would be attacked if there is war between iran and israel. just a the show time ago the iranian president said they do not take threats from israel seriously or as he termed the zionists. we have all means at our disposal. in a short time he will speak at a conference here in the united nations on the rule of law. the secretary-general over the weekendened when they arememberting to shy away rhetoric. we'll see if he follows up on that. representing the u.s. interests, attorney general eric holder. bill: we'll listen carefully here. syria is on the
enormous pleasure to welcome to the podium united states secretary of education arne duncan. [applause] [applause] >> thank you so much for that kind introduction. you don't want me in the treasury. i'm going keep the remarks brief. i would love to have a conversation with you. i'm thrilled to get in the focus on education. it's important for the country to be engaging in. a lot of challenges and hard work ahead of us. with i think we have a chance to breakthrough in fundamental way. i'll give you a snapshot where we think we are, where we're trying to go and the next stipes. a couple of numbers haunt me. 25% dropout rate in the country. that's a million of kids leaving our schools. no good jobs out there for them. and many of the african and latino that 40, 50, 60%. we are devastating entire communities unless we [inaudible] we used to lead the world in college graduate. today we are 1 4th. we wonder why we are struggling economically. i continue to think about the skill set in a time of employment rates we have as much as 2 million high wage high skills jobs that we can't fill. i thi
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
's got the uwe united states out of iraq. the united states after going up has now come down to some extent in afghanistan. he mdleast,ven though it's turbulent, is more open than it was. so i think the president in general can point to some areas where he moved forward and some areas obviously his critics will say where he movedded back. all in all it's a defense i believe and defendable record. >> ifill: i want to walk through some of that piece by piece. referencing the president's speech today, he turned over a big chunk of it to talking about the difference between railing against or speaking out against violence... violent extremism versus protecting free speech. why was so much devoted to that topic? >> gwen, i thought it was an interesting speech. very reflective speech. i think probably designd by the president and his advisors to try to heal some of the wounds that have been so apparent between the muslim world and the united states over these last two weeks, these very tragic weeks. i thought it was interesting the way he framed the issue. he clearly disassociated the unit
, the united states has not and will not seek to dictate the outcome of democratic transitions abroad. >> shep: the presidential nominees delivering high profile speeches about the challenges the world faces. >> syria witnessed the killing of tens of honests of people. >> the attacks on the civilians in benghazi were attacks on america. >> iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. >> we face a choice between the forces that will drive us apart and the hopes that we hold in common. >> shep: tonight president obama and governor romney on where america stands. that's first from fox this tuesday night. the leader of the free world and the man who wants his job delivered big speeches today. this morning governor mitt romney addressed the crowd at the clinton global initiative here in new york city. while just across town at the united nations, president obama spoke before the united nations general assembly. it was his final u.n. address of this term. and the problems in and around the middle east dominated both speeches as the president and governor romney addressed everything from iran's
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
. it was in the united states and we are talking about a place where it is not safe to send an f.b.i. agent. why the f.b.i.? because they do the best forensics. they are best at figuring this stuff out. it is our intelligence and others that put more fact on top of that letting us get to the bottom of this. this is benghazi. you do not just go wandering in with 15 or 20 f.b.i. agent. >>neil: something collapsed but we will find out. you are right, joe. very go to see you. >> i think i know why this guy had to draw pictures for the united nations. a lot them are pretty stupid at the united nations. they can tax your patience especially when they tax your wallet. are you ready ? share everything by turning your smartphone into a mobile hotspot for up to 8 wifi-enabled devices at no extra charge. like the new droid razr m by motorola only $99.99. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b med
a coalition of countries is holding iran accountable and that is why the united states must do when we must to prevent iran -- that last part, the we must do what we must to prevent iran obtaining nuclear weapon. what does that mean? will he launch u.s. military action. what will he do if israel launch as unilateral attack before the election against iran to stop its nuclear program? these are the major questions. martha: that is to the heart of it. that is what benjamin netanyahu said, wait, wait for what? this is the crux of the tension between the two. ed, thanks so much. be back to you in a little while. bill: we want to get back to carl cameron. you know what is on the plate, whether it is egypt, or iran's nuclear program, the dust-up with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. do you know from the campaign whether or not governor romney will address any of this or all of it or stay away? >> reporter: in the clinton global initiative he will larkly focus on issues he was sort of asked to speak about which is international development. he has specific ideas. linking foreign aid to o
two weeks, especially after the killing of ambassador stevens in libya. for the united states president, once again, there will behose tough remarks about iran, saying time is not limited. the u.s. president is going to be saying that there is just a time limit to diplomacy. the u.s. and many other nations extremely worried about iran's nuclear capability. iran's leader, mahmoud ahmadinejad, yesterday told the united nations in a speech about the rule of law that the security council members should be changed. they are allowing, in effect, israel to possess a nuclear weapon, while all the attention is focused on tehran. earlier in a meeting with reporters, he, in effect, again, questioned israel's legitimacy. this issue, of course, has been seen on the u.n. stage here for years. sometimes it's a side show. there are many other points president obama is going to mention, including saying how these attacks based on a video were totally uncalled for in the middle east region and that free speech must be a cornerstone of american democracy. soledad? >> all right, lots to look forw
will look at its importance in the region and its relationship with the united states. "this is america" visits the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. this year, kazakhstan celebrates its 20th anniversary of independence. on this program, we will learn about what it was like before independence 20 years ago, and how oil and a visionary president made kazakhstan the success it is today and why diversifying its economy will be the key to kazakhstan's even brighter future. >> it was a while the economy, while business economy, and a great economy mainly. today, we have a lot of public companies. our businessmen are doing international joint ventures. if you take the society as a whole, are people became much more open-minded, a free, outspoken people, and we are much different from what we were before. >> has that been exciting to be a
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize rhis columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rate short trem interest rates are already essentily at zero, the fed mov
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)